7 Health Apps To Keep Youth Healthy in 2019

By: Janaya Greene

This post is the first in a series of articles written by a member of our YTH Youth Advisory Board.

 

Mobile applications have provided space for young people to build new relationships and express themselves, through a variety of social media platforms, apps, and digital content platforms.  However, applications can play even larger roles in young people’s lives, by giving them the ability to have more control of their health.

Applications have proved useful in helping young people manage their health. No, I don’t mean pricey tech watches or self-diagnosing through Mayo Clinic’s online library —though the tool could be useful in putting young people in contact with providers. From meditation guides, to habit trackers, apps have become useful ways to supplement both young people’s mental and physical health.

As the new year approaches, a plethora of new applications are likely to hit app stores and add to the already growing list of supplemental tools. Below are a few examples of these, that help to empower young people in a variety of ways.

Simple Habit

With more young people experiencing high anxiety, panic attacks, and other mental obstacles that can lead to serious health concerns, meditation and mindfulness have become key ways young people try to de-stress. Simple Habit provides audio-guided meditations for a range of circumstances: trouble sleeping, a tension-filled commute on public transportation and more. The meditations are typically five-minutes, long enough for those with busy schedules—and short attention spans.

 

 

 

 

 

Doxy

Doxy.me is a telemedicine app that connects providers with healthcare professionals. Distance can often be an obstacle in connecting people with their health needs. From therapy, to medical advice, telemedicine apps like Doxy make consulting with providers much easier for people in rural areas, or those without the means to reach their physicians in person.

 

 

 

Flora

Flora is a health and wellness app that encourages people to create better physical habits, with the goal of making wellness accessible for all. One day, you may be challenged to drink a gallon of water, and the next week, you may be challenged to refrain from eating meat. If you accept a challenge and complete it, you earn coins that you can use towards earning discounts, products and more. The app’s community section also encourages users to support one another in their wellness journeys.

 

Period Trackers

Most application stores are saturated with period trackers, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing! While most offer the same abilities, each have quirks, whether it be distinct colors or types of reminders. They’re useful for any person hoping to have a better idea of their cycles or keep up with their contraception methods. Without my period tracker app, I’d be incredibly lost when my primary doctor asks me to recall when I had my last period.

 

 

 

 

 

They2ze

YTH’s very own they2ze connects trans-spectrum youth  and providers in California to local health services and inclusive support. Users can give and receive referrals, provide community feedback and complete PrEP modules with trans-specific education and information, including providing access. As all of the resources are vetted by peers in the trans community, youth can be rest-assured that the doctors and providers they seek care from are gender-inclusive.

 

 

 

 

Circle of 6

Circle of 6 provides users threatened with sexual assault with a group of peer supporters using GPS technology, community supporters, and emergency hotlines. The app was downloaded 7,000 times during the week of its launch in 2012 and received accolades from former Vice President Joe Biden. The app was originally created by YTH and The Line Group Inc.m but has since been sold to Tech 4 Good, LLC.

 

 

 

StreetConnect

StreetConnect is another mobile app created by YTH. It connects homeless and unstably housed young people to resources for clothing, food, education and free and low-cost healthcare.The app uses GPS technology to find these resources in youth’s local areas.

 

 

The types, as well as amount, of health-related applications are likely to increase this upcoming year,  as the industry explores technology’s ever-changing role in people’s health. As technology becomes increasingly central to our lives, health management is sure to follow suit.

 

YTH Youth Advisory Board Member, Janaya Greene is a journalist and recent graduate of The Ohio State University. She currently works with healthcare business magazine, Modern Healthcare. Janaya has worked as a VICE Media and Center for Communication Summer 2016 Editorial Fellow and an Audio & Video Production intern with Dynasty Podcasts in Chicago. The Southside Chicago-native is dedicated to highlighting often ignored voices through her storytelling and multimedia reporting. Janaya also wrote a short film, Veracity, that was presenting on Hulu and Showtime networks; it’s now available on YouTube and Amazon Video. Follow her on Twitter at @janayagr.




INNOVATE: NEXT
NEXT is a mobile responsive website to facilitate access to preventive services, including STD prevention, sexual health resources, and other social services for youth exiting supervised care systems (YESCS) like foster care and/or the juvenile justice system.
Learn more about this YTH project